Monday, 16 July 2012

Chanel Haute Couture A/W 2012/13 'New Vintage'! Xx

The Salon d’Honneur at the Grand Palais had not been used 
for a hundred years and it had been transformed for the event 
according to Elisabeth Quin on Chanel.com 
'into a dreamy, watery urban garden. 
With white wicker armchairs, pale gray walls, 
anthracite paving, lemonade and canapés
 and the dappled trompe-l’œil sky on the ceiling.
The atmosphere was a touch romantic, old-fashioned 
and marvelously civilized.
 The reappearance of a Proustian world, 
a Thomas Mann universe, a dreamland.'
Karl Lagerfeld, when interviewed
on Chanel.com lists the palette as that of 
Marie Laurencin the Cubist painter and friend of Picasso,
Braque and Matisse (read about her below).
Pale gray, off white, black and all shades of light pink 
in the main -
there are also accented colours of
ultramarine blue and darker fuchsia shade of pink.


With this 'New Vintage'
Karl Lagerfeld wanted to feel the attitude and spirit 
of the important Chanel Vintage pieces 
and 'project them on the girls of today'.


The silhouette is mainly free of jewellery or accessories. 


The fabrics themselves are so fine and so luxurious
 they could be jewellery 
- shimmering as they move.  

As Karl says the tweed is not tweed.  

It is fabric all embroidered

by hand which has taken at least '3,000 hours' to make. 

The embroidery is created by the plumassier Lemarié.



Made from feathers, tulle, organza, chiffon, 

satin, black velvet, sequins, the finest lace,
wool and the softest cashmere
the fabrics create the widest array

of textures and patterns imaginable
 and using the beautiful ethereal Marie Laurencin Palette.


The whole effect as Edgar Ramirez says is to create Art
                                            
                                      - this Chanel Haute Couture show Transcends Fashion
and becomes part of History
                     
                                      Indeed many decades are represented in the collection -


From the early part of the 1900s with white collars a la Colette,
to the 1920s with the low waists and narrow hips, 
to the 70s with the wide trousers, flowing shirts 
and very low cut backs on dresses,

right through to the 80s with the 
glam rock glitter sparkling stockings.



Take a look for yourself at the amazing 

Chanel Haute Couture AW 2012/12

'New Vintage' show below:






































































Bravo Karl, Bravo Chanel - We Adore 'New Vintage'! Xx


Marie Laurencin 1885 - 1956



Marie Laurencin


Laurencin was born in Paris where she was raised by her mother.

At 18, she studied porcelain painting in Sevres. 

She then returned to Paris and studied oil painting 

at the Académie Humbert.
 Laurencin was an important figure in the 
Parisian avant-garde and a friend of Pablo Picasso,

Georges Braque and Matisse. 

She was romantically involved with the poet 

Guillaume Apollinaire 


She Exhibited in the first group manifestation 

of Cubism at the Salon des Indépendants 1911.
 Her first one-woman exhibition was at the 
Galeries Barbazanges, Paris, 1912. 
She spent 1914-20 in Spain and Germany,
while married to Baron Otto von Waëtjen, 
then returned to Paris after they divorced.

After this time she achieved great success 
as an artist She is known as one 
of the few female Cubist painters, 
with Sonia Delaunay Marie Vorobieff and Franciska Clausen.
While her work shows the influence of 
Cubist painters, her approach to abstraction was unique.
Her subject matter was often groups of women and female portraits, 
her palette 
as we know well by now is of pale grays, black, all shades of pink,
  blue, pale yellow and off white.
The lines she used were curved rather than the angular ones
of Braque and Picasso - in fact more like Matisse's
Dance I and Dance II 1909-10


During this time Laurencin illustrated a 
number of books with etchings, 
lithographs or watercolours.
She also designed dresses and textiles for the couturier Poiret,  
and designed sets and costumes for the ballet and the theatre, 
including Diaghilev's Les Biches (The Does) in 1924.  
Coco Chanel was creating costumes for Diaghilev's 
Ballets Russes Le Train Bleu 
at the time and 
asked the artist to paint her portrait (see below).




Portrait of Coco Chanel 1924
Marie Laurencin Vogue Cover 1931



Il Bacio 1927











Femme Au Chien






Les Danseuses

La Vie Au Chateau


Cecilia de Madrazo and the Dog Coco 1915


In 1983, on the one hundredth anniversary of Laurencin's birth, 
                                   the Musée Marie Laurencin opened in Nagano Prefecture, Japan.                   
The museum is home to more than 500 of her works and an archive.


Check my Post:
to see Celebrities at the Show



Until next time J Xx










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